Development of XBX Plan

Why XBX Was Developed

Research has indicated that everyone – male and female, young and old – is in need of some form of regular, vigorous, physical activity. As more and more labor-saying devices are put into general use, as more and more people watch more and more television, films, and sports events, the amount of physical effort expended by the average person decreases continually. An analysis of the exercise needs of Canadians was conducted by R.C.A.F. specialists and led to the development of the 5BX program for men. XBX is the complementary program for women.

The R.C.A.F. analysis indicated three major deterrents to regular exercise:

  • a great majority of people would like to exercise but do not know how to go about it — what to do, how to do it, how often, how to progress, or how far to progress;
  • most exercise programs call for the use of equipment and gymnasiums which are not always available; and
  • most exercise programs call for a great expenditure of time, which most people cannot spare. Clearly a program which resolves these problems is required.

The XBX tells you what to do, where to start, how fast you progress, and how far you should progress to achieve a desirable level of physical fitness. It requires no equipment and very little space, and takes only twelve minutes a day.

How XBX Was Developed

XBX is the product of extensive research into the problems of physical fitness or girls and women, the research having been conducted at several R.C.A.F. stations and in the later stages having included sections of the civilian population. Over 600 girls and women of all ages participated in the project and the R.C.A.F. is indebted to them for their contributions to the program.

The first step in the project was the administration of a series of physical fitness tests. The tests included an examination of muscular strength and endurance, testing of heart response to activity and measurement of fat layers. From the results of these tests the physical fitness needs of women were analyzed. Experiments were carried out with a wide variety of exercises to determine those most effective in producing the desired results. Many of these exercises were discarded as ineffectual. The ten exercises of XBX provided the most balanced and effective program.

The time limits for each exercise were varied until the optimum time for good results was determined, and the tests were conducted to arrive at the number of times each exercise could be done, and should be done, within the time limits. Several hundred women used the first experimental exercise program and periodic tests showed that XBX was an effective plan to improve levels of general fitness.
The program was then distributed to groups and to individuals across Canada for further trial and comment. Further modifications in the plan were made on the basis of this final field trial. The results of this research are presented in this article – the R.C.A.F. XBX Plan for Physical Fitness.

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